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Announcements

SAYING THE UNSAYABLE
A Writers Workshop with

Stellasue Lee, Ph.D.

Saturday, January 28,2017
10am – 4pm
Fee: $25 Museum Members
$30 General Public

 Class Description: Journal Writing/ transformation line is the key to a door of the subconscious. It is how one discovers what they are thinking/feeling. Explaining the unexplainable is something of a magic act, showing up to a blank page with an unfettered mind takes some doing. In this process, things happen that are always a surprise. This kind of writing is about reaching into the mid-section and exposing what lies within. It is one of the oldest methods of self-exploration and expression. It leads people to understand their inner core and how life works. It empowers them to change the course of their thinking. Once it’s down on paper, it lives.

Students should bring a notebook, and pen as well as their lunch. R.S.V.P. by Thursday, Jan. 26 to Terri Jordan, Curator 931-648-5780 or terri@customshousemuseum.org

 Stellasue Lee’s work is published in numerous literary journals. Two of her books have been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, Firecracker Red, a powerful collection of poems set squarely in the earth, and Crossing The Double Yellow Line, a journey of sharp turns and hair-pin curves. Her work has appeared in three more volumes, After I Fall, a collection of four Los Angeles poets, Over To You, an exchange of poems with David Widup, and 13 Los Angeles Poets, the ONTHEBUS Poets Series Number One. (Bombshelter Press.) Dr. Lee received her Ph.D. from Honolulu University. Now Editor Emeritus at RATTLE, a literary journal. Customs House Museum 200 S. 2nd Street, Clarksville, TN 931-648-5780

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Stellasue Lee won the grand prize in the Maylasian Poetry Aid competition!

The followup announcement appeared in this (click here) Arabic language newspaper. Below is the Google Translate version from the original Arabic:

ArabicAnnouncement

The announcement of the competition results noodles to the movement of poets and artists for the world

The movement of poets and artists for a different world results Msabaktha poetry organized by the Movement for this year under the title of “poverty and war,” in collaboration with the Organization of Poetry once supported the Malaysian, and the poem winning poet of America, Dr. Stella Lee, while opting for the jury of nine other poems to be published in the Anthology Lattice will be released soon, 5 of them American poets and two Englishmen, one Indian and another Zealand.

The jury was composed of Irish poet Steve Walker and American poet Joseph May Racine and Monia Bengali poet Khan and poet Malay Malayan Roses.

The noted regulator prize level of poetic texts to participate in this edition, which I knew posts for more than 200 poet of the most from all over the world, in addition to the posts of Arab poets and reached the 25 post texts in Alongelzaah including translated into English.

The poet Syrian Kurdish Nawzad Djadan founder of the poets and artists for a different world that the criteria that were used in the evaluation of poems depth of imagination poetic and technical picture, language, style and drafting, non-repetition and renewal of language, the power of passion, music interior of the text.

 

You can read her winning poem (click here)

You’ve probably noticed I’ve been gone from Facebook for a while

 

and I know some of you will be asking where I’ve been; so I wanted to make the short version available. I am recovering nicely at Vanderbilt Medical Center from surgery to correct an arthritic condition in my right hip.

 I expect to be discharged Monday to a Skilled Nursing Facility for some post-op recovery time, especially to gain more mobility before coming home. I had the additional complication of a strep infection in the joint, so my doctors implanted an anti-bacterial hip prosthesis that will remain for six weeks. During that time, I will also have a PICC line to continue the intravenous antibiotics. (continued below)surgery

 So we’ve all heard of, or even had, strep throat. But strep hip? Seriously, it’s pretty rare, so I’ve become something I never wanted to be: I am medically interesting! The good news is that I’m being cared for in a major research and teaching medical center that’s loaded with sub-sub-sub specialty doctors who are paying me lots of attention. The Center for Disease Control even stopped by to say hello and take my history to see if they could figure out the source of the infection!

 At the end of six weeks, I will have a second procedure to replace the antibiotic prosthesis with a normal hip replacement prosthesis. Following that, and after some recovery period including physical therapy, I will regain all my pre-surgery mobility functions.

 Thank you for all your good thoughts, and please… keep’em coming! Love and light!

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The Morning After: What People Said About the Salon

That was my first poetry salon and I loved it! I also loved all the people I met, especially the poets…. Very inspirational. I hope you have given yourself a huge pat on the back for pulling together something so special to the readers and the listeners.

How beautiful…. thank you! It was a lovely, lovely evening and my honor to be a small part of it. I look forward to seeing you again soon.

Oh I am thrilled by your words. I can only aspire to your level. We were mesmerized by your presence and words. I feel so lucky you are my teacher.

Thank you so much for having us last night. I left filled with warm words and thoughts, and this morning I think I may have written a poem and my vows. More well wishes than you know.

Congratulations on your beautiful event! We had a wonderful time and so enjoyed being a part of this special evening!

My friends and I enjoyed it so much. I had mentioned you to a friend when she began her blog about her family’s situation and had what I thought was a unique way of expressing herself. She later did become interested in writing and qualified for a group program where the students have mentors. By this time you had moved and I hesitated to send you unsolicited material. But she remembered my speaking of you when she saw the poetry reading notice and invited me to go with them. It was so good to see you, Stellasue. I am so glad that I was able to take a writing class with you during the time you lived in S.H. God bless you.

I had the most amazing night watching, listening and meeting such wonderful people. Your students are amazing and your following a loyal one. I estimated about 70 people were there and everyone left thankful that they came.

Thank YOU! It was a truly wonderful experience…very powerful.

 I just want to thank you for a wonderful Saturday evening.  I had great fun.  You had a wonderful turnout too. Namaste’

 

FREE EVENT

In Salon

With Stellasue Lee, Ph.D., Plus Three

 A poetry reading with Stellasue Lee, Ph.D. and three of her students:

Bob Buchanan from Scottsdale, Arizona

Sandra Rollins from Nashville, Tennessee

Angela Williams from Key West, Florida

 

Saturday, April 20

 

Art and Soul Studio

2303 12th Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37204

 

 6:00 PM until 9:30 PM

Open wine bar and finger foods

Stellasue Lee, Ph.D. is a teacher, founding Poetry Editor of Rattle, now Editor-In-Chief at Cardinal House Publishing, winner of the 2003 Library of Congress The Poet And The Poem; past president of Women Writer’s West, Los Angeles; and twice an entrant for the Pulitzer. She is the author of five books in print: firecracker RED, Crossing the Double Yellow Line, 13 Los Angeles Poets, After I Fall, and Over To You. Her poetry has been published in numerous anthologies and literary journals including the Connecticut Review, the Cortland Review, Margie, the Paterson Literary Review, Quercus Review, and most recently the wonderful new journal Mas Tequila.

Pulitzer prize-winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa wrote about her work “[Stellasue] takes us to a sense of place, to loved ones, by way of sharp turns and hair-pin curves. I believe and trust the voices captured in these poems, [they] drive us toward the vortex of what matters.”

Stellasue will read selections from her forthcoming book Our Father, plus other work. She lives and works in Nashville, Tennessee with her artist husband Eric L Hansen and their two cats, Caylee and Tennyson.

 

Bob Buchanan has poetry forthcoming in The Mas Tequila Review and Ol’ Chanty – The Chanticleer Magazine Online. He has one book published Beyond the Wall, received with enthusiastic reviews. His second book is in progress. This from someone who had not written a word until a year ago, when he began studying with Stellasue Lee. Bob is our featured Student of the Month. To see more, click here. Bob travels to be with us from his home in Scottsdale, Arizona where he lives with his wife Robby.

 

Sandra Rollins will read selections from her recent work. She has studied with Stellasue Lee for less than a year and already has been accepted for publication in the wonderful journal Mas Tequila. Sandra lives in Nashville with her two cats Gus, and MJ and the princess, Bella, a ten-pound Yorkie.  She writes in snapshots of life, the kind we can all share and relate–significant and insignificant moments that define us as humans.  She puts into words what we hold secret, the moments we are afraid to share thinking we are alone in what we feel, all the while hoping we are not.

Angela M. Williams began writing poetry at the age of five with the support of her Montessori teachers. Her poem The Sun became the class song. During her formative years, Angela mostly forgot her love of creative writing and only on occasion would rap with her girlfriends during French class. She went off to college thinking she’d become a spy. But after two years studying Russian and a realization the Cold War was over… and more importantly she doesn’t like torture, she left Indiana University with a B.A. in Journalism. She paid her dues, eights years in advertising, and now she plays in the world of insight uncovering, product development and positioning as a qualitative market researcher. That work led her to observe shamans in the Amazon, to shopping for hair color with women going gray. The common thread throughout her life has been her love of imagination and creativity, a quest to understand “what’s the story” and a commitment to understanding the workings of the human heart.

While she was working towards an M.A. in Spiritual Psychology at the University of Santa Monica, friend, fellow student and poet, Jennie Chapman Linthorst, helped Angela re-discover her love of poetry. Angela’s second year project at the University was an exploratory to answer the question – “Do I want to be a mother?” One of her activities involved using Jennie’s skills as a poetry therapist to compile her reflections, longings and dreams for the future. Upon completion of her project and her degree, Angela realized she did want to birth something; poetry! She began studying with Stellasue Lee late in 2011.

Since then, she moved from Cincinnati, Ohio to Key West, Florida with her beloved partner, Tim, and her dog and mentor, Maddie. She is putting together a manuscript of her work. She plans to publish her first book by December of 2013.

After Shocks Poet Stellasue Lee,

Interview by Editor Tom Lombardo

January, 2013
A Poem by Stellasue Lee 
While Setting the Table
Daydreams are a form of reality, someone told me once, a separate
dimension where fiction and fact blend like eggs and sugar beaten into
a sunny concoction, grainy in substance with sticky qualities.
Maybe it was my daughter, as she whipped heavy cream by hand,
or rolled a lemon pepper pasta she hand-crafted and cut into wide
strips, then served so happily with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.
I breathe in this scene, call family to the table where we all can sit
gladly, waiting for the door from her kitchen to open,
and wearing my red-checked apron, she will appear
offering her latest creation. I won’t tell anyone this is only a dream.
I don’t even want to thinkabout the accident.
From her kitchen, some sweet melody I can’t recognize will float
around the dining room—so different fromthe rhythmic beat,
beat, beat of one lone drummer as we entered
a garden where we gathered to scatter her ashes among vibrant roses.
Interview: How did you come to write “While Setting the Table”? It was around Thanksgiving. I had been thinking about a previous Thanksgiving at my daughter’s house, how much she loved to cook, how much pride she took in growing her own herbs and vegetable. Everything was from scratch. And how beautifully it had been presented. I didn’t know I was going to write about her death, or that experience in her home, or how beautiful her auburn hair looked with just a puff of flour at her left temple. Oh, but that’s for another poem, isn’t it.I always start the way I teach my students, “show up to a blank piece of paper with nothing on your mind and start where you are, describe what you see until you come to a line that takes you outside of the room.” I had been reading an article on String Theory… the book was just to the right of my chair, and so, seeing that book, it made me think where I had heard about String Theory before, and someone told me that daydreams are a form of reality… someone I believed and trusted, and I thought it must have been my daughter.
How did writing this poem affect your recovery?
Every poem I write is a clue into who I am. I’m a mystery, maybe most of all to myself. I’m an introvert, so it’s really difficult for me to articulate what’s going on in my head. The thoughts just keep rolling around in there until I’m able to capture them in a physical form, and in this case, it’s most often in the form of a poem. It’s always a surprise. I write something and say, “Now, where did that come from?” And the things that just pop out… sometimes they are funny, sometimes they are just wrong. That’s when I think I must have heard that from my mother.

Can you tell us something about your process of writing that helped this poem come to life?For me, it’s about being present. It’s important to make time in my daily schedule to show up to the page. Writers write. I’m not saying it’s easy, but necessary, and it’s so essential to be open, not to think “Oh, this is a good subject for a poem,” or “I need to write about…,” Discipline, process, whatever you wish to call it, is key. Master cellist Pablo Casals told an interviewer why, at age 90, he still practiced every day, “Because I think I’m getting better.” Had I not made the time, showed up to the page, and started where I was, this poem would never exist.Who are your favorite poets or poets new to you whom you’d recommend to others?I think Raymond Carver is underrated. I was fortunate enough to have picked up a copy of Ultra Marine. I read it cover to cover, every poem, simply fascinated with his ability to be present. I couldn’t wait to get his next book Where Water Comes Together With Other Water. During the reading of that book, Carver died. 1989, his last book came out, A New Path To The Waterfall. I was lucky enough to read those three books in order, and saw what I thought was the growth of a writer. Since, his collected works have been released, All of Us, but in the early three volumes, I fell in love with this writer and his work showed me what it means to be present, live in the NOW, write, and to be unafraid.With my students, I read their work (some of my students have been in their 90’s,) and marvel at such brilliant ability. I started a small publishing company to help them get their work out. Maybe I’m more judgmental than a larger publishing company would be, but these writers measure up. Jennie Linthorst has studied with me off and on for ten years. I just did a book for her called Autism Disrupted… a mother’s journey of hope in poetry. She’s doing readings around the country and is teaching workshops in healing poetry. Bob Buchanan will soon have a book out titled Beyond the Wall, what a wonderful writer! Most of my students go on to publish in literary journals. They are doing such wonderful work.Of course, there are the well known. I like to pretend that if I got stranded on a desert island, there are 10 books I would need to survive: Ray Caver’s All of Us, Gerald Stern’s This Time, David Lee’s My Town, Philip Levine’s oh, anything by Levine, just anything at all, Stephen Dobyns, Velocities, James Dickey’s Poems, 1957-1967, Maxine Kumin’sStill To Mow, Yusef Komunyakaa,’s Neon Vernacular…. And, and I’d cheat too, somehow take more then ten, Szymborska, C.K. Williams, O’Hare, Neruda….. the list goes on and on. People who walk into my home, they always have a sharp intake of breath when they see my bookcase. It’s 10 ft. tall, and 15 ft. wide.What are you working on now?I did my last chapbook in 1996, Morning Comes With Its Bandages Of Light. I don’t remember how I came up with that title, but it’s a good one, I think. I have been encouraged by many people to put a body of work together from my father poems. I spent months agonizing over it. I finally got about 22 poems together. I’m working on a chapbook, 26 copies, numbered A through Z, plus 4 artist proofs. They are going to be printed on handmade paper, silkscreen cover and hand sewn. The title is Our Father, which since I have a brother, a simply marvelous brother, I thought that fitting. One of the two poems in Our Father was accepted for After Shocks. He returned from WWII with PTSD, and was riddled with survivors’ guilt. Imagine! A very young and artistic boy…I keep thinking of something he told me, “You live your heaven and hell right her on earth Kid. Better pay attention to the details.” So, to better pay attention to the details, I became a poet.

After Shocks Poet Stellasue Lee
Conducting Workshop in Michigan Feb. 16, 2013

An Intimate Writer’s Workshop with Pulitzer Prize nominee Stellasue Lee and Cheri L.R. Taylor.
Saturday, February 16, 2013, 9:00am – 7:30pmRoyal Oak, Michigan (Location details will be sent upon registration). This workshop is sponsored by Blushing Sky Writing Services. You may register at Blushing Sky Workshop RegistrationSchedule for the workshop:9 A.M. Breakfast, Introductions10 A.M. Stellasue Lee: Speaking in Tongues, a crash course in how to create individual and distinct personalities on the page by giving each voice its own energy. Both the male and female muses have decisive character traits. Find out how easy it is to make them shine in their own spotlight.11:45 A.M. Cheri L. R. Taylor: Icons and Images; In this workshop, you will explore common images and their (often cliche’d meanings). You’ll never see these symbols the same way again.1:15 P.M. Lunch and Book Signing2:30 P.M. Stellasue Lee: Pathway to the Unconscious, a process by which you can pass through the doorway to your unconscious mind and bring to light what you really think. We are after all, our own actors, stage-manages, directors, and ticket-takers in life. We can change the plot anytime we wish by looking at what matters.4:15 PM Cheri L. R. Taylor: Indulging the Senses: In this workshop you will explore one of the senses in a journey of descriptive fascination.6 P.M. Wine & Cheese, Reading Circle.Stellasue Lee’s work is published in numerous literary journals. Two of her books have been entrants for the Pulitzer Prize, Firecracker Red, a powerful collection of poems set squarely in the earth, and Crossing The Double Yellow Line, a journey of sharp turns and hair-pin curves. Her work has appeared in three more volumes, After I Fall, a collection of four Los Angeles poets, Over To You, an exchange of poems with David Widup, and 13 Los Angeles Poets, the ONTHEBUS Poets Series Number One. (Bombshelter Press.) Dr. Lee received her Ph.D. from Honolulu University. Now Editor Emeritus at RATTLE, a literary journal, she works privately with students all over the US. Stellasue was born in the year of the dragon.

It’s Your World, Let’s Write About It!

Blushing Sky Writing Services Presents…

An Intimate Writer’s Workshop with Stellasue Lee and Cheri L. R. Taylor

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An extraordinary opportunity to learn from Pulitzer Prize Nominee Stellasue Lee, Ph.D. and RARE Foundation Awardee, Cheri L. R. Taylor, M.F.A.With a strict limit of 10 participants, this workshop offers personal attention and the opportunity to share during each workshop section.Join us for an intimate workshop experience.

When:

Saturday, February 16th., 2013 (9:00am – 7:30pm)

Where:

Royal Oak, Michigan (Location details will be sent upon registration)

Class schedule:

9:00am

Breakfast, arrivals and introductions

10:00am

Stellasue Lee: Speaking in Tongues, a crash course in how to create individual and distinct personalities on the page by giving each voice its own energy. Both the male and female muses have decisive character traits. Find out how easy it is to make them shine in their own spotlight.

11:30am

Break

11:45am

Cheri L. R. Taylor: Icons and Images; In this workshop, you will explore common images and their (often cliche’d meanings). You’ll never see these symbols the same way again.

1:15pm

Lunch & book signing

2:30pm

Stellasue Lee: Pathway to the Unconscious, a process by which you can pass through the doorway to your unconscious mind and bring to light what you really think. We are after all, our own actors, stage-manages, directors, and ticket-takers in life. We can change the plot anytime we wish by looking at what matters.

4:00pm

Break

4:15pm

Cheri L. R. Taylor: Indulging the Senses: In this workshop you will explore one of the senses in a journey of descriptive fascination.

5:45pm

Break

6:00pm

Wine & cheese and reading circle

This is a wonderful opportunity to take your writing and creativity to the next level.

Click on the link below to register and ensure your participation in this unique event.

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Please bookmark this site and check back often.

MARCH, 2012 EVENT

Fifteenth Annual Blue Ridge Writers’ Conference   March 30 & 31!
Respond to this e-blast and
sign up for only $60.
(Save $10)

Date: March 30 & 31
Registration Fee:
If you respond to this e-blast,
 your fee will be $60 instead of $70.
 Writers will learn to hone their skills and expand their markets at the 2012 Blue Ridge Writers’ Conference the weekend of March 30-31, 2012 in Blue Ridge, Georgia at the Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association. A reception on Friday, March 30, 2012, will be open to the public.
Acclaimed novelist Amy Greene will kick off the conference with a keynote address about her work and her novel, Bloodroot. Other speakers include Nancy Knight, a literary agent with the Sullivan Maxx Agency, Jessica Handler, nationally known author of Invisible Sisters, Quinlan Lee, an agent with the Adams Literary Agency, Poet Robert Kimsey, author of Paths from the Shawnee Spring and Air Swimmer, Robert King, poet and editor of FutureCycle.com and
Poet & Editor Stellasue Lee. . 
For More Information on the Writers’ Conference and for an application please visit the sight below.
Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association
(The Art Center-Galleries on West Main)
420 W. Main Street
Blue Ridge, Georgia 30513
706-632-2144
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JULY, 2012 EVENT

Saying the Unsayable:

Workshop presenter Stellasue Lee

July 21, 2012 2-3:30 PM—

Workshops and lectures in special topics?• Stellasue Lee, Room M

As long as creative people feel in harmony with their work and are progressing they are happy and fulfilled. When the relationship breaks down, their interior life also breaks down.?      —Ira Progoff

Explaining the unexplainable is something of a magic act. Those who show up to a blank page show up to a blank page with an unfettered mind, will unravel the mystery and learn that journal writing/transformation line is the key to the subconscious and essential to the process. And in the process, things happen that are always a surprise.This kind of writing is about reaching into the mid-section and exposing what lies within. It is one of the oldest methods of self-exploration and expression and leads you to understand their inner core and how life works empowering them to change the course of their thinking. Once down on paper, it lives. This workshop will focus on what an image/moment consists of, and how showing—in place of telling—builds into a poem. Come prepared to do a writing exercise. Sharing will be optional.

Click here for how to register

 About Centrum

“I can’t believe a place like this actually exists”

Centrum, in partnership with Fort Worden State Park, is a gathering place for artists and creative thinkers from around the world, students of all ages and backgrounds, and audiences seeking extraordinary cultural enrichment. Centrum promotes creative experiences that change lives.

Located in Port Townsend, Washington, Fort Worden—a turn-of-the-century army base–offers an unmatched combination of natural beauty and historic interest. Acres of saltwater beaches, wooded hills, and open fields are framed by stunning vistas of the Olympic and Cascade ranges and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It’s a place where the land stops, the sea begins, and the mind keeps going.

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Check out this link for a new published poem by Stellasue Lee.  The Mas Tequila Review

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SPRING HILL ARTS LEARNING CENTER CLASS

Instructor: Stellasue Lee, Ph.D.     Email Address: stellasueL@aol.com

Title: Finding Your Voice to Say the Unsayable

Class Description: Journal Writing: How to find your way past grief and disappointments by looking at your life experience squarely on the page. All that is dredged up will finally be transfigured into something whole.

Explaining the unexplainable is something of a magic act, showing up to a blank page with an unfettered mind takes some doing. In this process, things happen that are always a surprise. This kind of writing is about reaching into the mid-section and exposing what lies within. It is one of the oldest methods of self-exploration and expression. It leads people to understand their inner core and how life works. It empowers them to change the course of their thinking. Once it’s down on paper, it lives.

One of the first things I do with new students is have them find someplace in their house where there is a lock. I tell them, “Go there, seize your critic by the scruff of the neck, toss it in, lock it up, and never let it out. It will complain, whine, threaten and wheedle you to let it  out. Don’t!” I try to follow that rule. I’ve done my job when I show up. I write from my experience, and I teach people how to be real.

Select Target Ages: Adults

Minimum Class Size: 12       Maximum Class Size: 6         Class Fee: $95.00

Day and Time Available: Saturday, 10-12 AM          Number of Sessions: 4

Class dates: February 12, 19, 26, and March 5th

For more class information, contact Shirley Barker at 931-490-6807 or sbarkspirit@att.net

No Supply fee

Students should bring a notebook, and pen

Bio: Stellasue Lee’s work is published in numerous literary journals. Two of her books have been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, Firecracker Red, a powerful collection of poems set squarely in the earth, and Crossing The Double Yellow Line, a journey of sharp turns and hair-pin curves. Her work has appeared in three more volumes, After I Fall, a collection of four Los Angeles poets, Over To You, an exchange of poems with David Widup, and 13 Los Angeles Poets, the ONTHEBUS Poets Series Number One. (Bombshelter Press.) Dr. Lee received her Ph.D. from Honolulu University. Now Editor Emeritus at RATTLE, a literary journal, she serves presently on the editorial board at Curbstone Press, www.curbstone.org. She teaches privately, and at writers workshops. Stellasue was born in the year of the dragon.

Robert Frost said, There are two kinds of language: the spoken language and the written language;–our everyday speech which we call the vernacular, and a more literary, sophisticated, artificial, elegant language, that belongs to books. We object to anybody’s talking in this literary, artificial English; we don’t object to anybody’s writing in it. We rather expect people to write in a literary, somewhat artificial style. I, myself, could get along very well without this bookish language altogether. Get ready for some fun.

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Spring Hill poet gets second Pulitzer nod

Stellasue Lee to teach workshop next month

By Jill Cecil Wiersma • THE TENNESSEAN • September 8, 2010

SPRING HILL — Stellasue Lee may have a knack for turning grief into praiseworthy literature. The Spring Hill resident has earned a second entrant for a Pulitzer Prize, this time for her new book of poetry firecracker RED. She was nominated in 2000 for Crossing The Double Yellow Line.

The Los Angeles transplant was halfway through writing firecracker RED when she moved here two years ago with husband, photographer Eric L. Hansen.

She read aloud one entry “Out of Nowhere,” a poem about hiding in a closet as a child from her father: “With yet another freshly poured drink, talking to the dead men in his unit, back riding the waves toward Omaha Beach.” Her eye’s eyes welled with tears, and her emotions became more apparent.

“I think that as I age, the losses pile on top of each other and become more devastating,” she said. “My father’s been dead 50 years,” she said, chucking apologetically for her reaction. But that vulnerability has been her strong suit. She said she makes her poetry accessible by writing of common experiences and by speaking plainly. Often, the topic is death and grief. “You give enough detail that allows the reader to relate to you; they can apply that to their own life,” she said. “You simply give them enough information to be in that moment with you.”

Lee is teaching a poetry workshop Oct. 2, 16, 23, and 30 at the Spring Hill Arts Center. Workshops she held last year at the library in Columbia filled up in the first day. By the second day, 36 people asked to be on a waiting list.

This time around, she’s not limiting the number of participants. She believes the city is full of newcomers, like herself, who long for an outlet to express themselves, and she’s eager to encourage them.

“I always start where I am,” she explained. “I never think, ‘Oh, that would make a good poem.’ I am just opening my journal and writing. I don’t know where it’s going to go.”

Poetry is one of 21 Pulitzer categories. The recipients are named in April and honored in May at a luncheon at Columbia University. Lee said she doesn’t count on winning this time — or ever.

“The chance I would get it are slim, slim, slim to none because I’m not affiliated with a university,” she said.

But that’s not disappointing for Lee, who said she’s more interested in shared human experiences. Spring Hill has nearly quadrupled in size over the last 10 years, and Lee said she identifies with those new to the community.

“There’s a real loss in that feeling of uprooting and having to find new doctors, new dentists, starting your kids in new schools. There’s real grief in that,” she said. “Those feelings are valid, even if it’s as simple as feeling like a stranger walking around in a market. There’s a real disconnect and loss.

“I want to teach people how to put that down on paper,” she said.

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Stellasue Lee of Spring Hill is nominated for her second Pulitzer Prize for her book of poetry, Firecracker Red. (JEANNE REASONOVER / THE TENNESSEAN)

Brown Bag Lunch Bunch
2nd
Stellasue Lee
Pulitzer entrant

Friday, May 14
11 am – 1 pm
Stellasue will be talking about her new book, Firecracker Red. Stellasue Lee is also author of Crossing The Double Yellow Line, and published by Cardinal House Publishing. Stellasue will address the elements of publishing and what it takes to get your work and/or art in print.
For more information about Stellasue, please visit  www.stellasuelee.com.
Grab your lunch and join us for a lunchtime of artistic fun and camaraderie. Bring a sample of your artwork to share with the group if you wish! The event is free and open to the public.
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Saturday, April 24th at 7 p.m. at Rippavilla Plantation

For more information on the location, go to http://www.rippavilla.org/
STELLASUE LEE reads from her new manuscript

FIRECRACKER RED AT RIPPAVILLA

Stellasue Lee, Pulitzer Prize entrant for her poetry,

reads from her newest book of poetry

Firecracker Red

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Williamson County Library presents

“The 20 Minute Poem for Busy People”

Stellasue Lee, published poet, will teach this class for people who think they don’t have time to write. She will show them a process by which they can produce a publishable piece in 20 minutes.

Saturday, April 24th, 9:30 a.m. to Noon at Williamson County Library

FREE
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Poetry reading Saturday at Grace Episcopal Church in Spring Hill

SPRNG HILL — Dr. Stellasue Lee will be featured in a live poetry reading at 6:45 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, at Grace Episcopal Church. She will be joined by Ramon Presson of Thompson Station, an author and columnist. “There is a reason why th…

1.5K – Aug. 5, 2009; scored 294.0
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SPRING HILL SENTINEL Of The

Kiwanis Club of
Spring Hill
Tennessee

P.O. Box 1822
Spring Hill
Tennessee 37174

Kiwanis’ Defining Statement
Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to changing the world one child and one community at a time.
July 14 – Stellasue Lee, PhD, made a delightful presentation touching on a variety of subjects. We all learned more about writing and the passion one must have to persevere in this field of endeavor. She wanted to make a difference. She said she writes to touch the core within the reader. Poetry shares your emotional outlook, and liberates your speech. Good poems cause reflections. Dr. Lee noted our passion to touch the hearts of others, and had praise for our efforts.

This Ain’t Your Grandmother’s Poetry Reading August 8, 2009

6:45 PM at Grace Episcopal Church

5291 Main Street, Spring Hill, TN

Call 931-489-3223 for information. Light refreshments

Readers to be Stellasue Lee, Ph.D

and

Ramon Presson, author and marriage counselor
A Lively Poetry Event at Rippavilla Plantation
* featuring Pulitzer entrant, Stellasue Lee and

Ramon Presson, author and marriage counselor
Rippavilla welcomes Stellasue Lee and Ramon Presson for an evening of poetry June 20, 2009 beginning at 7:00 p.m. Lee will be reading from a new body of work, Firecracker Red, due to be released by the end of the year. “To have a poetry salon in this historic home is a privilege.”  Her book, Crossing The Double Yellow Line, February 2000, was an entrant for a Pulitzer Prize. Lee moved to Spring Hill with her husband, the artist Eric L. Hansen a year ago. She received her Ph.D. from
Honolulu University. Now Editor Emeritus at RATTLE, a literary journal, she presently serves on the editorial board at Curbstone Press in Connecticut.
Ramon Presson, author of a dozen non-fiction books, readily confesses that his first love is poetry, an affection rewarded as a young adult with an Academy of American Poets prize. An enthusiastic student of Stellasue Lee, she says about her apprentice, “Ramon has a rare ability for language. His humor, tenderness, and intelligence all allow the reader to identify and stand beside him within the poem.” A firm believer that poetry can speak both with a deep voice and a mischievous grin, Presson will read from his collection, “The Twelve Steps for Poets Anonymous”.

For more information on the location, go to http://www.rippavilla.org/

Transplanted Pulitzer Poet Feels Right at Home
“I’m from California. I know about earthquakes, not tornadoes.” Understanding the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning is one of the few adjustments to Tennessee that Stellasue Lee has not made quickly. The Pulitzer entrant for poetry and her husband Eric Hansen moved to Spring Hill in 2007 and the transplanting has been very smooth for the west coast native.

“I think I had been trying to leave Los Angeles all my life. The first time we came to Nashville I woke to birds singing, to a clear sky without smog. I breathed in each day. The lush green of lawns and real trees and spacious pastures opened to me. I feel differently in Tennessee.” But it wasn’t just the climate and inspiring landscape that impressed her.

“We joined a small church in Spring Hill and people were happy to see us, welcomed us, made us feel part of the community whereas in Los Angeles, I would arrive late, sit in a corner, and leave early. I lived in the same house for 17 years in L.A. and once in a great while, I would see a neighbor and wave, but here, I’ve made friends, good friends of my neighbors. I can honestly say that I love them.”

Writers can often lead a more isolated life and can even be reclusive, but Stellasue Lee is one of the most accessible authors you’ll meet. And if you live in Spring Hill long enough you’ll probably meet her. Not because she has time to just wander and mingle about town. This decorated poet, university instructor, and editor emeritus of one of the country’s most prestigious literary journals keeps a steady schedule of writing and teaching. Over the years she has moved from teaching in the classroom to teaching students one-on-one all over the U.S. via phone and e-mail correspondence.

“While I work out of my home writing and teaching students I’ve become a social butterfly. I’ve made more friends in one year than in all my life in California. I led a journaling workshop at the Maury County Library and I’d liked to offer more writing workshops like that. I’ve joined the Williamson County Arts Council and the Spring Hill Arts Council. I have this great desire to share with my community what I’ve spent a lifetime of studying to know and practice.”

Ramon Presson is one of those students, but he doesn’t live several states away, more like a few streets over. It’s a long story how they connected but they have developed quite a bond. Says Presson, an author and marriage and family therapist who lives in Thompson Station, “How often does a Pulitzer caliber writer move into your subdivision? And one who gladly takes on individual students! I feel incredibly blessed. I have learned more in 9 months studying and writing with Stellasue than I have in the past 20 years of self-study and taking workshops.”

A successful non-fiction author, Presson insists this is the most fun he’s ever had writing. “I started writing poetry as a young person and received some awards and publication. But when I began writing and publishing articles and books I seemed to lose my poetic voice. I wondered where the poet went and I doubted I’d ever get him back.”

Stellasue certainly has reawakened the poet in Presson. Says Ramon, “It’s not just that I’m writing poetry again, but I’m writing at a level I didn’t know I was capable of.” And there’s no mistaking whom he credits for that blooming. “I tell her that she is my Mr. Miyagi and I’m her Karate Kid. She is so knowledgeable of the craft of writing and so skilled at teaching. And so encouraging. Do you know how many writers would have me killed off so they could take my position here?”

The master and the apprentice began looking for an opportunity to do a public reading together of a selection of their original poems. Rippavilla Plantation was immediately charmed by the idea and is playing enthusiastic host to the ticketed event on Saturday evening June 20th. Beginning at 7pm the duo will share the stage for a presentation called Firecracker Red, with refreshments and reception to follow. Tickets are $4 at the door and proceeds will go to the preservation efforts of Rippavilla Plantation.

Says Stellasue, “There is a reason why this presentation is called firecracker RED… it is going to be popping, crackling poems about life, love, marriage, children, struggle, and faith.” Lee and Presson share a concern that poetry is often perceived as either sappy or impossible to understand. The pair is adamant that good poetry is accessible, that a high quality of writing should not soar over the heads of readers. Says Lee, “If the reader or listener doesn’t understand the poem, the writer has not done their job.” Presson nods, “Henry Kissinger once said that if you’re famous and you bore people they think it’s their fault. I have little patience for poems and poets who presume the right to bore readers in the name of high art.” The mischievous look on the faces of Lee and Presson suggest that this poetry event will be anything but boring.

Stellasue relishes the opportunity to bring more attention to the literary arts in this region that is so rich in creativity. Mindful that she lives in the shadow of Music City, she is fond of reminding all that every songwriter is a poet first before they are a singer. Her eyes sparkle when she speaks of Spring Hill and writers in the same sentence and you can tell the wheels in her head are spinning with ideas. Says the star poet about middle Tennessee “This is not only home now, I feel like this was the place where I should have been born.” It is safe to say that regardless of where Stellasue Lee should have been born, her adopted community is just glad she’s here now.

See samples of poetry at www.StellasueLee.com and www.RamonDPresson.typepad.com
—————————————————————-

* featuring Pulitzer entrant, Stellasue Lee
and

Ramon Presson, author and marriage counselor
Rippavilla welcomes Stellasue Lee and Ramon Presson for an evening of poetry June 20, 2009 beginning at 7:00 p.m. Lee will be reading from a new body of work, firecracker RED, due to be released by the end of the year. “To have a poetry salon in this historic home is a privilege.”  Her book, Crossing The Double Yellow Line, February 2000, was an entrant  for a Pulitzer Prize. Lee moved to Spring Hill with her husband, the artist Eric L. Hansen a year ago. She received her Ph.D. from
Honolulu University. Now Editor Emeritus at RATTLE, a literary journal, she presently serves on the editorial board at Curbstone Press in Connecticut.

Ramon Presson, author of a dozen non-fiction books, readily confesses that his first love is poetry, an affection rewarded as a young adult with an
Academy of American Poets prize. An enthusiastic student of Stellasue Lee, she says about her apprentice, “Ramon has a rare ability for language. His humor, tenderness, and intelligence all allow the reader to identify and stand beside him within the poem.” A firm believer that poetry can speak both with a deep voice and a mischievous grin, Presson will read from his collection, “The Twelve Steps for Poets Anonymous”.

For more information on the location, go to http://www.rippavilla.org/
Transplanted entrant for the Pulitzer Prize in poetry, she feels right at home. “I’m from California. I know about earthquakes, not tornadoes.” Understanding the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning is one of the few adjustments to Tennessee that Stellasue Lee has not made quickly. A Pulitzer entrant for poetry, she and her husband Eric Hansen, moved to Spring Hill in 2007 and the transplanting has been very smooth for the west coast native.

“I think I had been trying to leave Los Angeles all my life. The first time we came to Nashville I woke to birds singing, to a clear sky without smog. I breathed in each day. The lush green of lawns and real trees and spacious pastures opened to me. I feel differently in Tennessee.” But it wasn’t just the climate and inspiring landscape that impressed her.

“We joined a small church in Spring Hill and people were happy to see us, welcomed us, made us feel part of the community whereas in Los Angeles, I would arrive late, sit in a corner, and leave early. I lived in the same house for 17 years in L.A. and once in a great while, I would see a neighbor and wave, but here, I’ve made friends, good friends of my neighbors. I can honestly say that I love them.”

Writers can often lead a more isolated life and can even be reclusive, but Stellasue Lee is one of the most accessible authors you’ll meet. And if you live in Spring Hill long enough you’ll probably meet her. Not because she has time to just wander and mingle about town. This decorated poet, university instructor, and editor emeritus of one of the country’s most prestigious literary journals keeps a steady schedule of writing and teaching. Over the years she has moved from teaching in the classroom to teaching students one-on-one all over the U.S. via phone and e-mail correspondence.

“While I work out of my home writing and teaching students I’ve become a social butterfly. I’ve made more friends in one year than in all my life in California. I led a journaling workshop at the Maury County Library and I’d liked to offer more writing workshops like that. I’ve joined the Williamson County Arts Council and the Spring Hill Arts Council. I have this great desire to share with my community what I’ve spent a lifetime of studying to know and practice.”

Ramon Presson is one of those students, but he doesn’t live several states away, more like a few streets over. It’s a long story how they connected but they have developed quite a bond. Says Presson, an author and marriage and family therapist who lives in Thompson Station, “How often does a Pulitzer caliber writer move into your subdivision? And one who gladly takes on individual students! I feel incredibly blessed. I have learned more in 9 months studying and writing with Stellasue than I have in the past 20 years of self-study and taking workshops.”

A successful non-fiction author, Presson insists this is the most fun he’s ever had writing. “I started writing poetry as a young person and received some awards and publication. But when I began writing and publishing articles and books I seemed to lose my poetic voice. I wondered where the poet went and I doubted I’d ever get him back.”

Stellasue certainly has reawakened the poet in Presson. Says Ramon, “It’s not just that I’m writing poetry again, but I’m writing at a level I didn’t know I was capable of.” And there’s no mistaking whom he credits for that blooming. “I tell her that she is my Mr. Miyagi and I’m her Karate Kid. She is so knowledgeable of the craft of writing and so skilled at teaching. And so encouraging. Do you know how many writers would have me killed off so they could take my position here?”

The master and the apprentice began looking for an opportunity to do a public reading together of a selection of their original poems. Rippavilla Plantation was immediately charmed by the idea and is playing enthusiastic host to the ticketed event on Saturday evening June 20th. Beginning at 7pm the duo will share the stage for a presentation called firecracker RED, with refreshments and reception to follow. Tickets are $4 at the door and proceeds will go to the preservation efforts of Rippavilla Plantation.

Says Stellasue, “There is a reason why this presentation is called firecracker RED… it is going to be popping, crackling poems about life, love, marriage, children, struggle, and faith.” Lee and Presson share a concern that poetry is often perceived as either sappy or impossible to understand. The pair is adamant that good poetry is accessible, that a high quality of writing should not soar over the heads of readers. Says Lee, “If the reader or listener doesn’t understand the poem, the writer has not done their job.” Presson nods, “Henry Kissinger once said that if you’re famous and you bore people they think it’s their fault. I have little patience for poems and poets who presume the right to bore readers in the name of high art.” The mischievous look on the faces of Lee and Presson suggest that this poetry event will be anything but boring.

Stellasue relishes the opportunity to bring more attention to the literary arts in this region that is so rich in creativity. Mindful that she lives in the shadow of Music City, she is fond of reminding all that every songwriter is a poet first before they are a singer. Her eyes sparkle when she speaks of Spring Hill and writers in the same sentence and you can tell the wheels in her head are spinning with ideas. Says the star poet about middle Tennessee “This is not only home now, I feel like this was the place where I should have been born.” It is safe to say that regardless of where Stellasue Lee should have been born, her adopted community is just glad she’s here now.

See samples of poetry at www.StellasueLee.com and www.RamonDPresson.typepad.com
—————————————————————–

Firecracker Red: